FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 9/21/2011

Contact: Contact: Eric Fullerton

(617) 778-1906

Fall 2011 Boston Bar Journal Highlights Court Funding Crisis

Amid an ever worsening state court funding crisis, The Boston Bar Journal (BBJ) today announced that starting with its Fall issue, the BBJ will launch a series providing first hand accounts that detail the impact of inadequate state court funding.

In Justice Denied: The Ramifications of the Trial Court Budget Cuts, Manisha Bhatt, a Senior Attorney in the Family Unit at Greater Boston Legal Services, takes her readers inside the Probate and Family Court as she works to help a client in crisis. In This Week in Housing Court, Judge Robert Fields, writes about a court where the adage "do more with less" has reached its limit due to the fiscal constraints of the Trial Court -- not withstanding diligent efforts by staff to be responsive to litigants whose matters are anything but routine.

Also appearing in the Fall edition of the BBJ. . .

Court Funding and Sustainability
By Lisa C. Goodheart

Four Part Profile of Lisa C. Goodheart

AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion: Is Feeney Finis
By Donald Frederico and Clifford Ruprecht

Commonwealth v. Fremont: the SJC Addresses the Intersection Between the Massachusetts Public Records Law and Court-issued Protective Orders
By James Carroll, Peter Simshauser and Christopher Clark

Data Breach Class Action Litigation -- A Tough Road for Plaintiffs
By Timothy Madden

"You Need a Permit for That?" Some Practical Tips for Local Permitting
By Andrew Upton

Getting Uncle Sam To Talk: Obtaining Potentially Important Evidence from the FBI For Use in Civil Proceedings
By Joseph Sulman

The BBJ is the flagship, online quarterly publication of the Boston Bar Association, and will "hit the stands" before the end of September.

The Boston Bar Association is a non-profit, voluntary membership organization of 11,000 attorneys drawn from private practice, corporations, government agencies, legal aid organizations, the courts, and law schools. It traces its origins to meetings convened by John Adams, the lawyer who provided pro bono representation to the British soldiers prosecuted for the Boston Massacre and went on to become the second president of the United States.