FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 3/6/2013

Contact: Contact: Eric Fullerton

(617) 778-1906

Saul Ewing Becomes 74th BBA Sponsor Firm

Saul Ewing LLP, a regional mid-Atlantic law firm with 240 lawyers and 11 offices along the East Coast, today became the Boston Bar Association's 74th Sponsor Firm . Saul Ewing provides clients with full-service representation from attorneys who exert national influence on sophisticated matters and simultaneously leverage the power of micro connections they make through their local offices. The Boston office focuses in particular on real estate, business and finance, commercial litigation and environmental law and has a niche in government contracts and construction work.

Becoming a BBA Sponsor Firm is a small but significant step in the firm's strategic plan to expand its Boston office, which was established in 2011.

"Our attorneys are Boston-based, with most of us growing up in the area and living here for most of our lives," said Richard Gass, Managing Partner of the firm's Boston Office. "Supporting and being active in the bar is part of how we do business within the community."

Located at 131 Dartmouth Street in the Back Bay, Saul Ewing's Boston office has 17 attorneys, 3 paralegals and 15 staff members and is growing, particularly in the practice of intellectual property law. The firm's clients range from regional developers, investors and entrepreneurs to national retailers and government agencies. Many of Saul Ewing's Boston-based attorneys serve as firmwide leaders and managers, highlighting the firm's commitment to establishing roots in Greater Boston.

"The Boston Bar is one of the premier Boston-area legal organizations, and provides our attorneys and clients with valuable networking, education and outreach opportunities," Mr. Gass said. "We decided to become involved as a sponsor as a way to help us raise our profile as one of Boston’s leading legal organizations."

The Boston Bar Association is a non-profit, voluntary membership organization of 11,000 attorneys drawn from private practice, corporations, government agencies, legal aid organizations, the courts, and law schools. It traces its origins to meetings convened by John Adams, the lawyer who provided pro bono representation to the British soldiers prosecuted for the Boston Massacre and went on to become the second president of the United States.