FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 9/6/2013

Contact: Contact: Eric Fullerton

617-778-1906

Timothy Murphy to Chair Boston Bar Education Committee

The Boston Bar Association today announced that, effective immediately, Timothy Murphy of Sunstein Kann Murphy & Timbers will chair the Education Committee. As partner at the firm and co-chair of the patent practice group, Murphy regularly handles complex patent interference and reexamination proceedings and has extensive experience shaping strategies in patent litigations. At the BBA, he has been a member of the Education Committee since 2011. Murphy has also been an active member of the BBA's Intellectual Property Law Committee, serving as Co-chair from 2004-2006, and the Boston Bar Journal Board of Editors from 2006-2012.

The Education Committee oversees the education program of the BBA to ensure that it offers a high-quality and varied curriculum that serves the educational needs of the BBA membership and the entire legal community. Members of the Committee work individually with each Section of the BBA to formulate an education plan, track CLE progress if applicable, and discuss other policy issues as they arise.

The BBA Education Committee for the 2013-2014 program year will consist of thirteen attorneys:

Timothy Murphy, Chair
Sunstein Kann Murphy & Timbers

Justine Brousseau
Kimball Brousseau, LLP

James R. Burke
Hinckley, Allen & Snyder LLP

Allison Burroughs
Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP

Judith G.H. Edington
Sullivan & Worcester LLP

Alan H. Einhorn
Foley & Lardner, LLP

Ellen S. Kief
Law Offices of Ellen S. Kief

Michael J. Koehler
Keegan Werlin, LLP

Susan C. Murphy
Dain, Torpey, LeRay, Weist & Garner, P.C.

Chinh H. Pham
Greenberg Traurig, LLP

Mark D. Smith
Laredo & Smith, LLP

Jocelynne D. Welsh
Probate and Family Court Administrative Office

David E. Wilson
Corwin & Corwin, LLP

The Boston Bar Association is a non-profit, voluntary membership organization of 11,000 attorneys drawn from private practice, corporations, government agencies, legal aid organizations, the courts, and law schools. It traces its origins to meetings convened by John Adams, the lawyer who provided pro bono representation to the British soldiers prosecuted for the Boston Massacre and went on to become the second president of the United States.