FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4/17/2014

Contact: Contact: Eric Fullerton

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Boston Bar Association Applauds Nomination of Ralph Gants as Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court

Boston Bar Association President Paul T. Dacier issued the following statement regarding Governor Deval Patrick's nomination of Justice Ralph Gants as Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court:

"We applaud Governor Patrick's nomination of Ralph Gants to become the new Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court. Justice Gants is a 'judge's judge.'  He exercises excellent judicial temperament and is respectful to all those who appear before him.  Additionally, Justice Gants has long been a champion for access to justice and pro bono work, and has made these a priority since his appointment to the Supreme Judicial Court as an Associate Justice in 2009. In a time of economic difficulties and lack of funding for legal services, his leadership in this area has been indispensable, and will continue to be as he takes the reins of the state's highest court. Justice Gants is not only experienced, having served more than fifteen years on the bench, but also cares deeply about the welfare of the people of the Commonwealth and has constantly demonstrated his commitment to bettering the lives of all of Massachusetts' citizens."

Justice Gants was nominated to the state's highest court in 2008 by Governor Deval Patrick. Before that appointment, he served on the Superior Court since his elevation in 1997 and as Business Litigation Session Superior Court Justice in 2008. Justice Gants has Co-Chaired the Massachusetts Access to Justice Commission since 2010, and has served as Justice member of the SJC's Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Services since 2011. In 2012, the Boston Bar Association awarded Justice Gants with its Citation of Judicial Excellence.

The Boston Bar Association is a non-profit, voluntary membership organization of 11,000 attorneys drawn from private practice, corporations, government agencies, legal aid organizations, the courts, and law schools. It traces its origins to meetings convened by John Adams, the lawyer who provided pro bono representation to the British soldiers prosecuted for the Boston Massacre and went on to become the second president of the United States.