FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11/16/2009

Contact: Contact: Eric Fullerton

617-778-1906

BBA Mourns Loss of John P. Driscoll, Jr.

BOSTON - Upon learning of the unexpected death yesterday afternoon of Boston Bar Association past President John P. Driscoll, Jr. of Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP, BBA President Jack Regan issued the following statement:

"Jack Driscoll was a giant in the legal profession and the community. In 1990, the year he began serving his one-year term as BBA President, Boston had just lived through an attempt to falsely accuse a black man of the murder of Carol DiMaiti Stuart, and the country was trying to come to grips with the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Through symposia and outreach to a variety of civic groups, Jack poured his heart and soul into improving race relations in our city and protecting the legal rights of people living with HIV/AIDS.

A lawyer with a seemingly endless list of friends and contacts throughout the city and the nation, Jack also started the Boston Bar Association Law Day Dinner, an event that now attracts more than 1200 lawyers and judges each year, created a task force to improve the correctional system in Massachusetts, and played an active role in preventing a tax on legal services.

A former trustee of the Boston Bar Foundation, Jack in his later years represented the Boston Bar Association in the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association.

Jack Driscoll's contributions to both the legal profession and the community were profound, and he will be sorely missed. The BBA extends its heartfelt sympathies to his family."

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Jack Driscoll's wake will be held on Wednesday, November 18 from 4-8 at the Brown & Hickey Funeral Home in Belmont. The funeral mass will be held on Thursday.

Expressions of sympathy to Jack's wife, Jane, may be sent to 81 Quail Lane, Hyannisport MA 02647.

The Boston Bar Association is a non-profit, voluntary membership organization of 12,000 attorneys drawn from private practice, corporations, government agencies, legal aid organizations, the courts, and law schools. It traces its origins to meetings convened by John Adams, the lawyer who provided pro bono representation to the British soldiers prosecuted for the Boston Massacre and went on to become the second president of the United States.