FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 2/8/2011

Contact: Contact: Eric Fullerton

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Boston Bar Association Welcomes Jones Day as Sponsor Firm

Highlighting the importance of engaging global law firms committed to making a positive difference in local communities, Boston Bar Association President Donald R. Frederico today welcomed Jones Day as a BBA Sponsor Firm. Jones Day, a law firm with more than 2,500 lawyers and 34 offices throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and South America, opened its Boston office last month.

"Jones Day has an exemplary reputation for excellence and public service, and we are delighted to welcome them to the ranks of our Sponsor Firms," said Frederico. "Many of the lawyers at Jones Day have strong ties to Boston, and some have served as leaders at the BBA or its charitable affiliate, the Boston Bar Foundation.  By becoming a BBA Sponsor Firm, Jones Day is demonstrating its commitment to Boston and to the BBA’s mission of advancing professional excellence, access to justice, and service to the community."

Jones Day's Boston office will offer a full complement of legal services, as well as Jones Day's one firm worldwide access to its lawyers around the Globe. The firm expects there will be close to 20 lawyers in the office by the end of the first quarter in 2011.

"Jones Day is committed to being actively involved in the Boston community, and that means, in the legal community, being actively engaged in the BBA," said Traci Lovitt, partner-in-charge of Jones Day's Boston office. "The BBA is a fantastic organization that truly cements the Boston legal profession, and Jones Day is proud to be a part of it. We expect to benefit from Boston's vibrance, both here and as conduits to our colleagues around the world, and we intend to contribute to it as much as we can. Partnering with the BBA is a great way to start that process."

 

The Boston Bar Association is a non-profit, voluntary membership organization of 12,000 attorneys drawn from private practice, corporations, government agencies, legal aid organizations, the courts, and law schools. It traces its origins to meetings convened by John Adams, the lawyer who provided pro bono representation to the British soldiers prosecuted for the Boston Massacre and went on to become the second president of the United States.