FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 6/6/2011

Contact: Contact: Eric Fullerton

617-778-1906

MEDIA ADVISORY

What: Public Hearing on Bill for Post Conviction DNA Testing

When: Wednesday, June 8 at 1 p.m.

Where: Gardner Auditorium, Massachusetts State House

Why: For every defendant wrongly convicted, a criminal goes free, and society remains at risk while the individual who has escaped the consequences of his actions is free to commit crimes against other victims.

On Wednesday, June 8, 2011 at 1 p.m., the Massachusetts Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing for S753 and H2165, An Act to Provide Access to Forensic and Scientific Analysis. Filed on behalf of the Boston Bar Association, this legislation follows the release of the BBA's report, "Getting It Right: Improving the Accuracy and Reliability of the Criminal Justice System in Massachusetts." One of the report's key recommendations is that Massachusetts enact a statute that would guarantee post conviction access to DNA testing and require preservation of biologic forensic evidence.

Aside from Oklahoma, Massachusetts is the only jurisdiction in the United States without such a statute.

Among those testifying in support of S753 and H2165 . . .

*Martin F. Murphy, a partner at Foley Hoag, a former First Ass't D.A. in Middlesex County, and a former Assistant U.S. Attorney.

*David E. Meier, a partner at Todd & Weld, a former Chief of Homicide for the Suffolk County D.A.'s Office.

Gregory J. Massing, General Counsel, Executive Office of Public Safety and Security.

David M. Siegel, Professor, New England Law | Boston.

Dennis Maher, a Massachusetts exoneree who spent 19 years in prison for a rape he did not commit.

Betty Anne Waters, a high school dropout who became a lawyer solely for the purpose of exonerating her brother, Kenny, who spent 18 years in prison for a murder and robbery he did not commit.

*Co-Chairs of the BBA Task Force to Improve the Accuracy and Reliability of the Criminal Justice System

The Boston Bar Association is a non-profit, voluntary membership organization of 11,000 attorneys drawn from private practice, corporations, government agencies, legal aid organizations, the courts, and law schools. It traces its origins to meetings convened by John Adams, the lawyer who provided pro bono representation to the British soldiers prosecuted for the Boston Massacre and went on to become the second president of the United States.